Thursday, November 17, 2005

Thud! - Terry Pratchett

This will be another short musing, as I generally feel with someone as popular as Pratchett, everyone knows already anyway. They already have and have read the book, and my opinion is worth bleargh.

For me, this book was largely miss. There were a few very lovely instances where he hit the spot, but overall, it was miss. This was surprising considering his last few books have, for me, been very hit. I felt that the themes didn't resonate, including weirdly enough, prejudice. It was there, it was clear, but I didn't feel it. The Summoning Dark didn't hit a nerve, and I wondered through the length of the book what it's actual purpose was.

Regardless, it's still a well written book, as Pratchett seems incapable of writing a bad book. I daresay I'll go back and read it at some stage, and wonder why it didn't work for me the first time around.

Verdict: It's Pratchett. You've already made up your mind.


And now, I am caught up on verdicts. Go me. (Which was why I chose to read Johnathon Strange & Mr Norrell as I knew it would take me a while to get through.)

4 comments:

  1. Did you get Where's My Cow as well though?

    That's far more worthwhile than Thud! itself...hehe

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  2. I'm just not a fan of Pratchett, I think. I tried reading The Colour of Magic and it didn't work for me. Then I tried Guards, Guards! and that didn't work for me either.

    I think I prefer depressing stories to funny ones.

    I can't really write funny either.

    Maybe I just have a black heart...

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  3. His later books are less slapstick funny and more dark funny. You might want to try NIGHTWATCH, which was quite dark, and one of his best.

    Funny is very hard to write though. I did it once, and I've probably used up all my funny quota for life now.

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  4. I'd recommend Monstrous Regiment over Nightwatch from the current crop of books (those since he "discovered the joys of plot"). Almost as good, but with less references to the rest of the books, and thus easier to get into.

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